Home Care, Adult Day Health and Supportive Living

sanborn placeby Janet Simpson Benvenuti

Each month I visit assisted living and continuous care retirement communities to learn more about housing options for seniors. While most are well-managed, beautifully-appointed communities replete with book clubs and outings, dining rooms and transportation services, I remain uncomfortable that these communities are financially out-of-reach for the majority of moderate-income families. Last week I visited Reading, Massachusetts, population 24,747, to meet Jacqueline Carson, executive director of Sanborn Place, an integrated care solution for lower income seniors and adults with disabilities that includes home care, adult day services, and a continuous care housing option. Recently, Sanborn Place has received national attention and will be featured in Dr. Atul Gawande’s next book on elder care and end of life.

Here are the three programs Jacqui supervises:

Sanborn Home Care provides home care services in short increments, if necessary, working in partnership with the local Visiting Nurses Association, the VNA of Middlesex East.

Sanborn Day is an adult day health center with capacity for 75 seniors or younger people with disabilities. Visually resembling the lobby of an upscale hotel, the center provides breakfast and lunch, exercise classes in partnership with the local YMCA, physical therapy, medication supervision, counseling for caregivers, and activities including a pool table, crafts, and computer games such as the Dakim Brain Fitness Program. My visit interrupted a game of charades with a roomful of joyful elders and it included an unanticipated discussion about the Massachusetts governor’s race with a well-informed senior.

Sanborn Place is a non-profit, federally funded facility for seniors whose incomes do not exceed $33,050 (single) or $37,800 (couple). Upon arrival, I was greeted by four older women sitting in the lobby who proudly revealed their ages: 93, 95, 87 and 83 as they awaited their friend, age 102, who was taking a nap. The community has 73 units, half assigned to seniors who require daily support, others for those needing weekly support or none at all. Each apartment includes a living room and kitchen with a private bath and bedroom not unlike those in high-end communities. Seniors remain in their apartment until the end of their lives.

Payment for these services comes from many sources including Medicare (for skilled nursing care and PT or OT services), HUD, the Veterans Benefits, and Mass Health.

While many communities offer similar programs, what’s unique is the integrated way that care is provided and the number of private citizens involved. Jacqui oversees the delivery of these three programs supported by a stellar team of professionals and individuals like brothers Gregg and Bruce Johnson, who created DKJ Foundation in honor of their father to raise funds for Sanborn Place. You may learn more about their foundation here.

As the tsunami of boomers age, many without enough family members to fill the role of caregiver, I remain encouraged and inspired by people like Jacqui, Bruce and Gregg who take responsibility for the well-being of all of the older citizens in their town and do so with a passionate commitment to help them remain a vibrant part of the community they’ve always called home.

© 2013 Circle of Life Partners, LLC. All rights reserved.

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