Where do I find help for Aging Parents?

by Janet Simpson Benvenuti

The scenarios are all too common. A worried daughter lives in Chicago; her aging parents reside in Florida. A son works on the west coast while his widowed mom lives in Virginia. How do adult children find support for their aging parents when they need assistance? Many families elect to find a local professional care manager to help them and their parents navigate the elder care system.

How do you find a competent professional care manager? In five simple steps.

Step 1. Check with your employee benefits group to see if your Employee Assistance program provides help from professional care managers.

Step 2. Get names from the professionals in your parents’ lives. Specifically, ask their physician, attorney and financial advisor for names of local care managers. For example, many elder law attorneys have relationships with professional care managers.

Step 3. Reach out to your parents’ local Council on Aging. Speak with the director or the nurse or social worker on staff. Ask them to recommend a local professional care manager.

Step 4. Search for professionals using one of three national organizations: the Aging Life Care Association, the National Association of Healthcare Advocacy Consultants and the Alliance of Professional Health Advocates.

Step 5. Interview prospective care managers. Email info@colpartners.com for a copy of our interview guide.

The chemistry between your parents and the person whom you’ve entrusted to support them is key to a successful journey together.

Finding the right care manager can take time, but the benefit is having a professional who can provide care advice and information about available community resources over the duration of time your parents need support.

Post any thoughts or questions below.

Food for Healthy Aging

by Janet Simpson Benvenuti

Earlier this summer, leaders in the food service industry met for their Menus of Change annual summit at the Culinary Institute of America’s Hyde Park campus.

Among their initiatives are to show that “changing menus is a powerful, and previously underappreciated, way to drive improvements in our health” and to make “plant-forward” dining mainstream. Plant-forward is a style of cooking and eating “that emphasizes and celebrates…plant-based foods including fruits and vegetables; whole grains; beans, legumes and soy foods; nuts and seeds; plant oils; and herbs and spices.”

These diets are not only good for our health but also for the health of the planet. So, your mother was right, eat your vegetables and get at least some of your protein from beans and legumes instead of meat. Here is an infographic that makes it easy to create a plant-forward diet Principles for Healthy Meals along with a recipe for lentil soup you may enjoy.

Got Health? Give.

by Janet Simpson Benvenuti

Our mission at Circle of Life Partners includes supporting the leaders of non-profit organizations that improve the health and well-being of older people and their families. This summer, many of us plan to walk, run, cycle or golf for a cause; there is no better way to improve our own fitness with friends and family while helping others. Below are links to a few of our favorite events. Feel free to post other local or national events in the comments section or on our Facebook page. We want to support your favorite causes, too.

Most families have someone living with heart disease or cancer, respiratory illnesses, arthritis or diabetes. In August, join the annual Pan-Mass Challenge bike-a-thon. Nationally, check out the Team for Cures events for Multiple Mylenoma; join the Fight for Air Climb in skyscrapers across the country to support the American Lung Association; or ride with Tour de Cure for the American Diabetes Association.

Because half of the caregiving dollars in America are spent supporting someone living with cognitive impairment, walk or ride for the Alzheimer’s Association or join local golfers to support the DKJohnson Foundation. Other neurological illnesses such as Parkinson’s, ALS and Multiple Sclerosis also consume caregiving resources and benefit from our engagement. Remember the Ice Bucket Challenge? Funds from that campaign helped scientists identify NEK1, a gene that may cause the disease, so your support to these, and other campaigns, matters.

Mental illness afflicts millions of Americans and NAMI, the National Alliance on Mental Illness, is among the organizations that provide ongoing support and guidance to families. Join one of the NAMI Walks and let’s make mental health an equal priority for all.

To your health!

c2017 Circle of Life Partners, LLC. All rights reserved.

Let’s Help End Alzheimer’s: Move for Minds

by Janet Simpson Benvenuti

Save the Date: June 4, 2017. Join thousands of women across the country at Equinox Sports Clubs to help end Alzheimer’s disease, a disease that disproportionately impacts women. Maria Shriver @mariashriver and the Women Alzheimer’s Movement @WomensAlz have teamed up with Equinox to host the annual Move for Minds event in seven cities nationwide.

Get your sisters, daughters and girlfriends together and register below for this fun-filled fundraising event. All monies raised are donated to researchers on the cutting edge of a cure.

Just click on the city below to register NOW.
In Washington D.C.
In Boston, MA
In San Francisco, CA
In Dallas, TX
In Orange County, CA
In Miami, FL
In Los Angeles, CA

c Circle of Life Partners, LLC. All rights reserved.

You Can Avoid Alzheimer’s Disease

by Janet Simpson Benvenuti

Getting Alzheimer’s disease is not inevitable with age. In a recent TED talk, Dr. Lisa Genova, neuroscientist, Massachusetts native and author of several books including Still Alice shared five ways you can avoid cognitive impairment.

You likely know the first four.

1. Get a good night’s sleep;
2. Follow the Mediterranean diet;
3. Exercise several times a week; aerobic exercise is best with strength training to enable fitness; and,
4. Lower your stress levels through prayer, yoga, or meditation.

What often surprises people is the fifth preventative: Learn something new. Exercising your brain through new experiences builds synaptic capacity. Lisa referred to the now famous Nun Study, research that followed the lives of 678 nuns who generously agreed to allow their brains to be autopsied upon their passing at ages 75 to 107. To their surprise, the researchers found that several nuns’ brains had the telltale Alzheimer’s lesions yet these women displayed no evidence of cognitive impairment while alive. Why? Their brains had ample capacity because of a lifetime of learning.

Watch the video. Share this post with your friends and family. Then join me in learning a new language using an app like Duolingo. Au revoir und auf wiedersehen.

c Circle of Life Partners, LLC. All rights reserved.

Eldercare: How to Avoid Sibling Discord

by Janet Simpson Benvenuti

Recently I teamed up with geriatrician Dr. Leslie Kernisan to share how to minimize family conflicts that arise even in the closest of families when a parent or older relative becomes ill and needs support. Dr. Kernisan is a practicing geriatrician with an active interest in educating seniors and their adult children how to achieve Better Health While Aging.

Sibling conflicts arise from a lack of clarity about roles and responsibilities that change as a parent’s or older relative’s needs increase. Geographic distance, job demands, financial strain and even denial will elevate stress and tension. In this podcast, you’ll learn the key roles relatives play and the four actions that insure successful aging. Learn, too, how a quick sketch of a family tree helps identify and fill gaps in support long before assistance is needed.

Like you, I often listen to podcasts on walks or when commuting. I listened to our edited podcast on a rainy day while chopping vegetables to prepare beef barley soup. Here is the recipe and the podcast.

c Circle of Life Partners, LLC. All rights reserved.

Campus Alert: You Forgot Something, Mom. The HIPAA Release

eos_yale_firstsession015by Jan Simpson Benvenuti

Whew. What a summer. Your son or daughter is now settled into their dorm, engaged with classes and ready for the year ahead. You’ve celebrated their high school graduation, savored their last summer before college, checked off the list of items for the dorm. You found those extra-long sheets, fresh towels, and a small fan; you met the roommates and unpacked the clothes; you lingered at the door, hesitant, nostalgic, wondering where the years went, praying that you’ve done enough, that the next four years will transform your child from a capable adolescent to a competent young adult.

You’re excited for them, but you’re worried, too. You follow the news. You combed through the Department of Education’s Campus Safety and Security website, noting the number of Criminal Offensives, Rapes, Robberies and Assaults reported on campus for the last three years. You know that freshman and sophomore girls are particularly at risk. You’re aware of the binge drinking statistics, and that the collective IQ of testosterone-laden adolescent males decreases in packs. You’ve heard that 20% of young adults, one in five, will experience mental health issues like anxiety or depression. You know these things, but you also know that you’ll be there for him or her, whatever transpires, just as you’ve supported them for 18 years. In fact, you’re making plans to revisit the campus soon.

But you forgot something. Your child is 18, and at 18 they become legally responsible for their own medical decisions. That’s right. Even their pediatrician, someone you’ve known for 18 years, can no longer disclose their medical information to you. It’s illegal to do so. So if your son is taken to the emergency room or your daughter seeks mental health counseling, the physicians and psychologists have no legal right to discuss their health with you. They may not even contact you.

Fortunately, the solution is a simple one. You don’t need to contact an attorney, just have your teen sign a HIPAA Authorization Form. Reply to this post or send an email to info@colpartners.com. We’ll send you a copy of the form with instructions. Bring it to campus. Have them sign it. Put a copy in University Health Center and keep a copy for yourself. Call this preventive medicine. Hopefully, the accident won’t happen, the call won’t come, they will navigate the college years without incident. But should they need your help, you’ll be able to quickly support them, just as you’ve always done.

c Circle of Life Partners, LLC. All rights reserved.

Why Do Men Die First?

92016-why-men-die-first
by Janet Simpson Benvenuti

Women outlive men by six years. Heart disease in some men begins at 35. Like you, I never questioned why until I read Why Men Die First by Dr. Marianne Legato. Dr. Legato, professor of clinical medicine at Columbia University, has been studying the differences in health between the sexes for decades. Her research found several ways to help men avoid premature death, summarized by Don Fernandez at WebMD.

Here are five suggestions to lengthen the male lifespan.

1. Speak candidly with a physician. Although men are inherently more vulnerable than women genetically, their cultural conditioning encourages them to take risks, deny pain and show no weakness. Those social pressures make them reluctant to seek medical help and speak frankly to their physicians. Mothers, spouses, sisters and friends play an important role in helping men reach out for help before a medical condition worsens.

2. Men are biologically predisposed to infection. Boost the immune system with proper diet, exercise and sleep. Avoid infections by using condoms and keep immunizations, including tetanus shots, up to date.

3. Treat depression. Like in women, depression is a risk factor for heart disease and stroke, and older men are more likely than women to become suicidal and take their own lives.

4. Watch young adolescent males whose lifestyle make them vulnerable to injury or death.

5. Assess the risk for heart disease and take steps to lower risk factors. Some men, especially those in stressful jobs like firefighters and police officers, show evidence of heart disease as young as 35.

For more insights and guidance, listen to this 30-minute video posted by Second Opinion, an informative discussion about why men age more poorly than women.

Together, let’s help our sons and spouses, brothers and nephews lengthen their lifespan.

c Circle of Life Partners, LLC. All rights reserved.

Is your Teenager Turning 18? Protect Their Health

by Janet Simpson Benvenuti

Do you have a niece or nephew, child or grandchild turning 18 this year? Be sure to have them sign a HIPAA Authorization Form before leaving home for college. Many parents of college-aged students are surprised to learn that they can not access their teenager’s medical information without their explicit permission, a right to privacy embedded in HIPAA legislation. Some parents discover they’ve been denied access in the middle of a medical or mental health crisis, a situation easily avoided by having your teenager sign a permission slip called a HIPAA Authorization Form on their 18th birthday. This form, which takes only a minute to complete, does not require an attorney nor notarization.

Listen to my video and request your free copy of the form, with easy instructions, by simply replying to this blog post or emailing info@colpartners.com with HIPAA in the subject line. Make this task a priority, on top of your “to-do” list, ahead of finding the twin-extra long sheets for dorm beds.

Please share this message with friends and family who have teenagers. Don’t let them leave for college without signing this document. Here’s why from Consumer Reports.

c Circle of Life Partners, LLC. All rights reserved.

Are You One of the Village People?

by Janet Simpson Benvenuti

Next Thursday, June 30th, I’m heading to Cape Cod to join the Village People. I won’t be donning my cowboy boots or singing “Y-M-C-A” but I will be leading a fun, community-wide conversation about aging and aging in place with Neighborhood Falmouth, one of the first virtual retirement villages in the United States. Joining our conversation will be experts in law, financial planning, home care and senior housing along with working daughters juggling aging parents and teenage children, Baby Boomers planning for their own longevity, and a random cowboy or two. If you’re heading to Cape Cod for the fourth of July, especially if you’ll be spending time with your older relatives, stop by and join the conversation. Learn why fewer Baby Boomers will be using senior housing. No singing skills required.

Here’s where we’ll be on Thursday, June 30, 2016, 7pm-8:30pm: Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Falmouth, Sandwich Road, Falmouth.

c2016 Circle of Life Partners, LLC. All rights reserved.