Valentine’s Day: A Gift of Love

valentine's day cardby Janet Simpson Benvenuti

Our mission at Circle of Life Partners includes supporting the leaders of non-profit organizations that improve the health and well-being of older people and their families. On Valentine’s Day, in addition to buying cards and gifts for your loved ones, consider making a donation of time or money in their honor.

Below are links to some of the organizations we support.

1. Consider donating to a non-profit organization that supports research to cure the illnesses that afflict family members. Most families have someone living with heart disease or cancer, respiratory illnesses, arthritis or diabetes.

2. Because half of the caregiving dollars in America are spent supporting someone living with cognitive impairment, consider a donation to The Cure Alzheimer’s Fund or the Alzheimer’s Association. Other neurological illnesses such as Parkinson’s, ALS and MS also consume caregiving resources and benefit from our generosity.

3. Mental illness afflicts millions of Americans and NAMI, the National Alliance on Mental Illness is among the organizations that provide ongoing support and guidance to families.

4. Support artistic programs that focus on seniors such as ARTZ, Dance for PD, or Alive Inside with their plans to provide ipods and music to all living in nursing homes. Communities of writers such as Grub Street offer memoir writing workshops for older citizens while the National Center for Creative Aging provides training to encourage the widespread adoption of arts programs in senior communities.

5. Organizations with long-histories of supporting elders such as JF&CS and local hospitals, Councils on Aging, and food programs are always appreciative of donations of time and money.

I hope you’ll join us and share your love this Valentine’s Day beyond your immediate family. Post your favorite organizations below or on our Facebook or LinkedIn Group so we may promote their work as well. Collectively, we can have a significant impact on those who make it easier for us to celebrate the lives of those we love.

c 2015 Circle of Life Partners, LLC. All rights reserved.

ARTZ: Artists for Alzheimer’s

by Jan Simpson

Recently I attended a forum in Boston where I met Dr. John Zeisel and Sean Caulfield, co-founders of ARTZ, an organization that hosts community events for people living with memory loss and their caregivers. Drawing on the support of artists and cultural institutions such as the Louvre in Paris, the Museum of Modern Art in New York City, the National Gallery of Australia, the Big Apple Circus and the Tribeca Film Institute, ARTZ has enable thousands of people living with Alzheimer’s and related dementias to have access to arts and culture.

Standing before an art exhibit, John spoke passionately about how art experiences can significantly enhance the lives of those living with dementia. The evidence surrounded him as the room was filled with paintings and photography created by people living with Alzheimer’s disease. I could feel the joy they all must have felt as they created their paintings, many perhaps beyond the point where they could express themselves with words. While some paintings were detailed and colorful, my eyes were drawn to one that appeared rather simplistic, a Star of David and a rectangle with colored bars. “That person,” John said, “could no longer speak but he was telling us, ‘I’m still here.'”  When his family saw the painting, they began to cry. Their father was a Holocaust survivor and his drawing captured his memory of that experience. “Alzheimer’s doesn’t take away memory, your memories are all in there. It’s as if you put the memories in the glove compartment and you lost the key; the art unlocks it,” said John.

ARTZ does more than encourage artistic expression.  By creating interactive, educational programs in partnership with museums and theaters, it allows elders to enjoy an outing that is stimulating and therapeutic. Art experiences have been shown to significantly reduce psycho-behavioral symptoms often associated with dementia, such as anxiety, aggression and agitation, and to optimize remaining capacities.

On December 15th, I’ll be volunteering in Boston at “Meet Me at the Coolidge…and Make Memories” an interactive film program for people with memory loss and their partners. The film event was designed specifically to encourage audience discussion and reminiscence. The program will show short clips from classic films from the 1930’s to the 1960’s. Tickets are free. If you have a loved one living with dementia, consider bringing them to the program.  Click here to learn more about ARTZ and all of the programs it sponsors.  If someone you love is experiencing memory loss, consider adding art to his or her activities.

Do you have stories to share about the arts and your older loved ones?

©Circle of Life Partners™