Campus Alert: You Forgot Something, Mom. The HIPAA Release

eos_yale_firstsession015by Jan Simpson Benvenuti

Whew. What a summer. Your son or daughter is now settled into their dorm, engaged with classes and ready for the year ahead. You’ve celebrated their high school graduation, savored their last summer before college, checked off the list of items for the dorm. You found those extra-long sheets, fresh towels, and a small fan; you met the roommates and unpacked the clothes; you lingered at the door, hesitant, nostalgic, wondering where the years went, praying that you’ve done enough, that the next four years will transform your child from a capable adolescent to a competent young adult.

You’re excited for them, but you’re worried, too. You follow the news. You combed through the Department of Education’s Campus Safety and Security website, noting the number of Criminal Offensives, Rapes, Robberies and Assaults reported on campus for the last three years. You know that freshman and sophomore girls are particularly at risk. You’re aware of the binge drinking statistics, and that the collective IQ of testosterone-laden adolescent males decreases in packs. You’ve heard that 20% of young adults, one in five, will experience mental health issues like anxiety or depression. You know these things, but you also know that you’ll be there for him or her, whatever transpires, just as you’ve supported them for 18 years. In fact, you’re making plans to revisit the campus soon.

But you forgot something. Your child is 18, and at 18 they become legally responsible for their own medical decisions. That’s right. Even their pediatrician, someone you’ve known for 18 years, can no longer disclose their medical information to you. It’s illegal to do so. So if your son is taken to the emergency room or your daughter seeks mental health counseling, the physicians and psychologists have no legal right to discuss their health with you. They may not even contact you.

Fortunately, the solution is a simple one. You don’t need to contact an attorney, just have your teen sign a HIPAA Authorization Form. Reply to this post or send an email to info@colpartners.com. We’ll send you a copy of the form with instructions. Bring it to campus. Have them sign it. Put a copy in University Health Center and keep a copy for yourself. Call this preventive medicine. Hopefully, the accident won’t happen, the call won’t come, they will navigate the college years without incident. But should they need your help, you’ll be able to quickly support them, just as you’ve always done.

c Circle of Life Partners, LLC. All rights reserved.

Is your Teenager Turing 18? Protect Their Health

by Janet Simpson Benvenuti

Do you have a niece or nephew, child or grandchild turning 18 this year? Be sure to have them sign a HIPAA Authorization Form before leaving home for college. Many parents of college-aged students are surprised to learn that they can not access their teenager’s medical information without their explicit permission, a right to privacy embedded in HIPAA legislation. Some parents discover they’ve been denied access in the middle of a medical or mental health crisis, a situation easily avoided by having your teenager sign a permission slip called a HIPAA Authorization Form on their 18th birthday. This form, which takes only a minute to complete, does not require an attorney nor notarization.

Listen to my video and request your free copy of the form, with easy instructions, by simply replying to this blog post or emailing info@colpartners.com with HIPAA in the subject line. Make this task a priority, on top of your “to-do” list, ahead of finding the twin-extra long sheets for dorm beds.

Please share this message with friends and family who have teenagers. Don’t let them leave for college without signing this document. Here’s why from Consumer Reports.

c Circle of Life Partners, LLC. All rights reserved.