ConnectedVisits – Telehealth for Family Caregivers

by Janet Simpson Benvenuti

Each month I meet or speak at length with a dozen or more entrepreneurs across the country working on innovations in health care and healthy aging. Periodically, I will feature one of these businesses to keep you informed about new products or services that may help you better support your parents or grandparents as they age.

One new venture is ConnectedVisits founded by Dr. Krishna Gazula, a brilliant man whose passion is to help families and health care teams communicate more effectively. Like some of you, I was the “designated daughter,” the family member who drove my parents to their medical appointments and discussed their care with their physicians. With ConnectedVisits, other family members or health care specialists such as a social worker or nutritionist easily could have joined those conversations, improving communication among all and saving me considerable time and energy repeating the physician’s guidance to everyone involved with their care. When needed, my sisters and brothers also could have attended some of those appointments virtually and their physician would have had ready access to x-rays and other medical information on-line while talking with us.

ConnectedVisits intends to raise funds next month to further develop their product. You can follow their work here.

Have you had any experience with telehealth?

c 2013 Circle of Life Partners, LLC. All rights reserved.

Circle of Life Partners Goes to Italy – The Food

italy_rome_1280px[1]by Jan Simpson Benvenuti

As summer begins, I am mindful of the three tenets of healthy aging: food, fitness and family, each of which got my renewed attention during a recent trip to Italy with my husband and children.

Have you been to Rome? The Romans may drive wildly, but they certainly know how to prepare and enjoy food. Recently, a scientific study in Spain confirmed what Italians have known for centuries: the Mediterranean diet, rich in fresh fruits and vegetables, fish, nuts, olive oil and red wine, does indeed extend life and delay the onset and advancement of disease.  Our favorite restaurant, La Taverna dei Fori Imperiali,was a family-run trattoria near Piazza Venezia and the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, the entrance hidden in an alley as narrow as my son is tall. The owner welcomed us warmly and offered to select the five courses and wine for our dinner, portions small by American standards, but sufficient to satisfy even my son’s 6’6″ frame. We lingered between courses for conversation and laughter, the pacing of the meal as unhurried as the Sunday dinners of my childhood. In addition to our trending slow food movement in America, I’d like to propose a slow dining movement.

In the States, you should expect to see increased attention to good nutrition as the health care system moves toward creating medical homes and boomers strive to maintain their health. Specialists, such as oncologists, have long included nutrition as part of the healing process, but you don’t need a hospital stay or a serious illness to find guidance.  Watch as:

  • Primary care practices, such as Iora Health, and neighborhood clinics add health coaches and nutrition counseling
  • Grocery stores offer nutritional guidance, such as the Stop-and-Shop near my home where one may schedule  appointments with a nutritionist on Thursdays
  • Private nutritional coaches, like friends at Weiser Choices, expand their coaching practices
  • Employers add group fitness and health coaching such as ShapeUp to their wellness programs

I’m still waiting for the time when it becomes routine for physicians to hand patients a stack of recipes instead of writing a prescription for yet another drug. Until then, I recommend a trip to Italy.

Ciao!

©Circle of Life Partners